Arthritis

Arthritis Diet and Exercise

Arthritis can be a painful condition for anyone to live with. Usually, if you have arthritis, it is either osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. In the former, the cartilage in the joints deteriorate, causing the pain. In the latter, the joints suffer from inflammation, and the cartilage may degenerate as well.

Arthritis exercises are often recommended by health professionals because it helps restore joint movement, function, and strengthen the knee.

Keep in mind, however, that you need to seek the consultation of a qualified health professional before starting any exercise program. It’s important to understand that arthritis doesn’t just affect the joints; it also may weaken or deteriorate what surrounds the joints: muscles, ligaments, tendons and the like. The right exercises will help strengthen all of these parts, not just the joints.

It is not uncommon for people with arthritis to experience pain and discomfort while doing their exercises. That’s why some health professionals will have such people on pain medications so that they can perform the beneficial exercises. On the other hand, there are certain arthritis knee exercises that put less strain on the knees and, therefore, are less discomforting.

For example, water exercises are often highly recommended by certain health professionals for certain kinds of arthritis because water permits the free movement of joints — yet, at the same time, it also offers a natural resistance you must work against, which helps facilitate the development of muscle strength.

Some health experts advocate doing exercises in the water if you have arthritis as a way to fight the condition.

Keep in mind, however, that if you are considering an exercise program of any kind, make sure you talk to your doctor first.

Having said this, let’s discuss some of ways water exercises may benefit you if you have arthritis.

Water Exercises

First, unlike many other kinds of exercises, water itself does not hinder the free movement of joints — yet, at the same time, it also offers a natural resistance you must work against, which in turn helps facilitate the development of muscle strength.

Second, unlike, for example, weight training, water exercise presents a gentle way to move your joints and muscles, exercising them, and helping to increase their range of motion over time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05UHTiAe5xo

Third, if you choose to exercise in warm water, it is a good way to increase your circulation…and warm water exercising can be relaxing, helping your body release endorphine’s — the body’s natural painkillers.

Fourth, water exercises for arthritis in the knees would be less physically stressful than other more taxing exercises such as bicycling or power walking.

Fifth, water is naturally buoyant and soothing and, therefore, may help quell aches.

This discussion on water exercises for arthritis should only serve as a starting point for your own research.

This is Important
Please remember that there are many different kinds of arthritis and therefore not all exercises will be good for every sufferer alike. Indeed, some forms of exercise may not be good for you at all.

Water exercises for arthritis in knees would be less physically stressful than other more taxing exercises such as bicycling or jogging. Water is naturally buoyant and soothing, and doing arthritis knee exercises in warm water can help improve circulation.

In short, if water exercises sound like something you’d like to try, speak with a health professional. You may find it not only improves your arthritis condition, but that you also get a great deal of enjoyment and pleasure from it.

Lastly, if you suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, which is characterized by inflammation of the joints, you should look carefully at your diet. Including anti-inflammatory nutrients and avoiding ones that casue inflammation may imrpove your condition markedly.

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Diet

There are many kinds of arthritis out there, such as rheumatoid, degenerative, osteo, and many more. Some of these may respond well to a diet, whereas others won’t. It often may depend on your individual makeup, and, therefore, it’s worth a try to see if you can gain some relief with a proper diet.

Refined carbohydrates should be avoided as there is evidence it may amplify degenerative arthritis or even cause it to occur more rapidly.

These may create an overload of acids in the system, which will deteriorate and harm cells. Your body will attempt to counter these acids with alkaline substances such as the mineral calcium, which may cause leeching of this mineral from your bones, thereby expediting the degneration of the arthritis.

It’s for this reason that many practitioners of alternative and complementary medicine advocate a gluten free diet and arthritis. In short, try to avoid: sugar (refined), flours, most grains.

Specifically, if you are looking to follow a gluten free diet and arthritis do not eat: wheat, rye, barley, oats. Examples include: bread, pasta, biscuits, cakes, etc.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet Suggestions

Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by inflamed joints. Therefore, foods and beverages that cause inflammation should be avoided if possible. This means you refrain or cut back on the amount of coffee you drink, since it has been linked to inflammation. Sodas and other caffeinated and sugar laden drinks should also be avoided.

Those concerned about rheumatoid arthritis and diet should also avoid milk and cut back on dairy products as these can cause problems for sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis.

Anti-inflammatory nutrients should be included in your diet. One of the best anti-inflammatory nutrients is a high quality Omega-3 Fish Oil Supplement.

Fish oils have been shown to help quell inflammation and benefit arthritis pains.

Some spices have potent anti-inflammatory properties, such as turmeric and ginger, and you may want to include these in your cooking or take them as supplements to see if they help you as they have helped others with arthritis.

This is Important
If you are thinking about a gluten free diet and arthritis make sure you talk to your doctor first.

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